Gut Brain connection

I’ve been talking with patients about this recently and the research and comment pieces are everywhere. Here is a nice link to the John Hopkins Medicine site, discussing the link between brain and gut.

Anxiety and depression have been thought to contribute to gastro conditions like irritable bowel syndrome (IBS). A Johns Hopkins expert explains how what’s going on in your gut could be affecting your brain. 

Can Food Affect Your Mood?

Although there is a lot of folklore around this subject (particularly with spices such as pepper and curcumin or teas), there is really not enough rigorous science to make practical recommendations. A basic healthy diet is really important. Beyond that, listen to your gut. Your nervous system and gut may be wired to react to certain foods, and you may feel better if you avoid them. If you’ve ever come back after lunch and felt tired, nauseous, or a little “fuzzy,” your enteric nervous system may be reacting to something you ate—and sending signals to your brain. 

If you’ve ever “gone with your gut” to make a decision or felt “butterflies in your stomach” when nervous, you’re likely getting signals from an unexpected source: your second brain.  Hidden in the walls of the digestive system, this “brain in your gut” is revolutionizing medicine’s understanding of the links between digestion, mood, health and even the way you think.  

Scientists call this little brain the enteric nervous system (ENS). And it’s not so little. The ENS is two thin layers of more than 100 million nerve cells lining your gastrointestinal tract from esophagus to rectum.

Click the link above for a full read.

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